Archive for September, 2013

When You Need to Be in Two Places at Once

September 30th, 2013

In the world of business, events can happen very quickly. This type of high-speed demand can require you to be in more than one place — simultaneously.

Imagine your company is based out of Sacramento, but you’re closing a deal on a merger with your associate in New York City with a third party from Atlanta. So, as you and your Atlanta business partner converge on the gathering in New York, you may have some significant, last-minute details to sort out before the meeting. But time is short. Is this impossible?

Rest assured, it’s not impossible — not anymore. Through the miracle of Web conferencing and Webcast service providers like RHUB, your business can employ effective Webcast solutions that will enable you to finish your planning while you’re en route.

For instance, during your threehour layover at the Chicago O’Hare International Airport, instead of watching the cable news channel or munching on airport cinnamon buns, you could wrap up those final merger details with your Atlanta partner in a mobile Web conference.

Investing in RHUB’s mobile conferencing services and online meetings empowers your business and its employees with the ability to connect through live video broadcasting from essentially anywhere. And through RHUB’s remote access capabilities, you can have instantaneous access to your desktop computer.

RHUB’s powerful webcast tools allow your employees to be free from their desks and out and about, representing your company and making connections with prospective customers and clients.

Now employees can be proactively engaged in building more business relationships because mobile devices like smartphones and tablets enable them to connect, even when they’re in transit.

Mobile phones enable your employees to participate in a conference from their own personal devices. These Webcast tools allow you to see who is planning to attend a meeting and to know who is currently speaking while a meeting is in progress. Plus, smartphones permit your employees to text other participants directly, as well as the whole virtual conference room to help facilitate communications.

The mobilization that’s now available through a Webcast company like RHUB can help your business to get outside the office and into this brave new world of 21st century business. And RHUB is ready to assist you. To learn more about our mobile conferencing and remote access solutions, visit our Web site: RHUB.

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A Few Considerations for Choosing an Effective Web Conferencing Solution.

September 24th, 2013

The lion’s share of Web conferencing users are currently relying on hosted services for their Webcasting solutions, primarily because they aren’t aware that better options exist. But first, let’s give credit where credit’s due, hosted services are generally easy to deploy, and they come in handy when you need to conduct a live broadcast on-the-go, while you’re away from the office.

Why There’s a Better Way Than Hosted Services

But hosted solutions aren’t nearly as secure as the two on-premise alternatives described below. One reason for this is because hosted services are deployed over the Internet, which leaves your company’s video Webcast content susceptible to the wiles of the Internet underworld. Now, we don’t mean to sound like alarmists, but just consider the logic of the following question: If a safer solution exists for sharing your Web conferences, wouldn’t you prefer to use that option over something less secure? Naturally.

Plus, let’s not forget that hosted solutions cost over time. As long as you’re subscribed to such a service, then you’re going to continue paying its ongoing costs. This sort of perpetual expense might not be a concern for every company, but we suspect that every smart business weighs the difference between upfront costs versus long-term service charges. Without question, the initial investment of an on-premise solution is much more cost-effective over time.

On-Premise Solutions: Better Security for a Better Price

On-premise software or an on-premise appliance both give you much more security than a hosted service. These on-premise options operate behind client-company firewalls, giving you another barrier of protection. So, what we’re talking about here is the difference between “private clouds,” which exist internally within a company, and “public clouds” or the wild and wonderful World Wide Web.

Here at RHUB, it’s no secret that we believe on-premise software is a step in the right direction, but we still believe the best option for Web conferencing is an on-premise appliance, which is what we offer with our RHUB 6-in-1 Web Conferencing Appliance. In just one appliance, your company gets Web conferencing, remote support, audio conferencing, video conferencing, remote access and Webinar capabilities. Why do we prefer an on-premise application over on-premise software? RHUB feels that the two biggest problems with on-premise software are its high upfront cost, and it is notoriously difficult to deploy.

RHUB Believes in Making Your Life Easier

Who said Webcast technologies can’t be easy? Why shouldn’t your business Webcasts be simple? RHUB believes you should save your time and energy for more pertinent “heavy lifting,” such as landing that big account or having smooth-sailing, live Webcast face-time with your family while you’re away on business. You’re far too busy — and your time is too valuable — to be burdened with a steep learning curve.

These are solely considerations of your own time, but what about the productivity of your overall organization? In 2010, a study called “The Work Design Collaborative” found that the time-consuming learning curve for implementing new technological programs took most organizations between 15 to 18 months before they began to see their productivity return. In today’s hungry business climate, that’s far too long to be out-of-commission. Obviously, an easy-to-use alternative (such as RHUB’s 6-in-1 appliance) can significantly reduce this learning curve and ease the burdens on your company’s time and money.

The Name You’ll Remember (Precisely Because You’re Not Forced to Hear It in Every Meeting)

Does it make sense for your company to pay money to create a Webcast recording only to hear the intrusive, name-dropping
advertisements of the Web conferencing service provider? It doesn’t make sense to RHUB, either. We enable you to brand your meetings with the name of your organization — not ours.

So, if you’re tired of paying relentless service charges or wrestling with a less secure system that’s difficult to use, then your friends at RHUB welcome you to prowl on over to our Web site to learn more: RHUB

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Which Web Conferencing Setup Is Right for You?

September 23rd, 2013

Communication technology has now reached a new frontier.
There’s no need to tie your message to a helium-filled balloon or the foot of a courier pigeon.

In an instant, your organization can interact with other remotely located parties, nationally or internationally, through the wonders of Web conferencing.

And after decades of evolution, we’re happy to report that Web conferencing is secure and easy to use — even if you don’t fancy yourself as being very “tech savvy.”

Better technology means more options for the user. You have three simple choices for your Web conferencing setup:

1. Hosted Service
2. On-Premise Software
3. On-Premise Appliance

Each option has its advantages and disadvantages, so which one will work best for you? We think you will know this answer for your organization better than anybody else. So, we’d encourage you to decide for yourself. But in case you would like more information, we have provided the following paragraphs to help you understand each of the three Web conferencing options, including their pros and cons. And don’t worry! The explanations below are even easier than blowing up party balloons (and definitely simpler than tying them).

Across the Board

There are a few characteristics that all three Web conferencing solutions have in common, across the board:
— All three options give you the ability to communicate within your organization.
— All three options give you the ability to communicate with other remote organizations.
— All three options simplify the process of data sharing.
— And of course, all three options will enhance your virtual meetings.

The Fork in the Road
The three Web conferencing solutions differ in where they are used, as well as some of their strengths. So, let’s take a look at some very specific differences.

HOSTED SERVICE

Hosted Service — The Pros
Hosted Web conferencing services are Internet-based, which makes it a great, offpremise solution, meaning, if you’re not at the office and you need to hold your Web conference from your home, that’s just fine. Your organization simply subscribes to the hosted service and then accesses its application online. No sweat. The hosted solution is the easiest to deploy.

Hosted Service — The Cons
Hosted solutions are less secure, so this will be a significant consideration for you if your organization deals with extremely sensitive information. And hosted solutions are a never-ending expense, as long as you’re subscribed, because they require you to pay an ongoing cost.

ON-PREMISE SOFTWARE

On-Premise Software — The Pros
On-premise software offers you greater security. It operates behind client-company firewalls for an additional barrier of protection and support. Private clouds (within an organization) are much more secure than public clouds (the Internet), because they work over an organization’s servers and its infrastructure, as opposed to being deployed over the Internet (aka The Wild West). When compared to hosted service, on-premise software is also cost-saving over time, and it has a lot more flexibility for integration and for branding (highlighting your organization’s name during conferences).

On-Premise Software — The Cons
The problem with on-premise software, however, is its high upfront cost, and it’s rather difficult to deploy.

ON-PREMISE APPLIANCE

On-Premise Appliance — For the Pros!
As with the on-premise software described above, an on-premise appliance offers you the same great security because it also operates behind client-company firewalls for an additional barrier of protection and support. Private clouds (within an organization) are much more secure than public clouds (the Internet), because they work over an organization’s servers and its infrastructure, as opposed to being deployed over the Internet. And just like on-premise software, when compared to hosted service, an on-premise appliance is also cost-saving over time, and it has a lot more flexibility for integration and for branding.

But unlike on-premise software, the on-premise appliance has a low upfront cost, and it’s easy to deploy, which usually makes it the all-around favorite, once people understand all three options.

Full Disclosure:
In the paragraphs above, we encouraged you to examine these options and choose for yourself. You know your organization and its needs better than we do, so we warmly welcome you to compare and contrast the three solutions for Web conferencing. And if this article has helped you — and you’re happy — then we’re happy, regardless of which solution you choose.

Now, you probably noticed a conspicuous omission of “cons” for the on-premise appliance. Well, that’s because here at RHUB, we personally believe that an on-premise appliance is the very best of the three solutions. That’s why our company has created the RHUB 6-in-1 Web Conferencing Appliance, which gives you Web conferencing, remote support, audio conferencing, video conferencing, remote access and Webinar capabilities — all through one appliance. But we’re not going to give you a big sales pitch here. If you’re interested, we’d encourage you to visit our Web site to learn more: RHUB

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Leveraging Web Conferencing to Make Effective Sales Calls.

September 15th, 2013

Most people think of using Web conferencing calls either
for internal company meetings or for connecting their kids
with a distant grandma. But this tool can also be used to
help you secure a new client relationship or for closing a
sale.

Web conferencing is more effective than a traditional phone call because in addition to having the slightly more personal touch of audio-visual correspondence, your prospective customers can share your vision through fullblown presentations.

And due to the time investment and cost of traveling — as well as the usual scheduling complications — Webcast tools can get you into a meeting with someone that might otherwise be unavailable.

So, here are a few pointers for leveraging your Web conferences to help you make sales:

The old adage of “Always be prepared to speak,” still holds true in modern business. Sales opportunities can occur at a moment’s notice, so you need to be prepared ahead of time by having the necessary sales documents or presentation slides available.

A potential customer’s interest can be fleeting, so you want to be able to capitalize on his or her “moment of intrigue” while the focus is still on your product. You can always be closing if you’re able to give an impromptu presentation through video broadcasting.

And by the way, a Webcast solution will allow you to send your sales documents to the interested party in real time, during the course of your meeting. Another helpful aspect of Web conferencing is being able to “call for backup,” so to speak. Whether you have your office manager sit beside you at your location, or you want to connect with your CFO remotely at a third location, live Webcasting gives you these opportunities. And there’s always the option of consulting with your team members privately during the meeting — even while speaking with your client.

So, if you would like to energize your sales team with the power of Web conferencing, we’d encourage you check out RHUB’s Webcasting solutions. There are a number of Webcast service providers, but of course, we’d recommend trying RHUB’s 6-in-1 Web conferencing appliance. RHUB gives you the six following real-time capabilities in one appliance: Web conferencing, remote support, audio conferencing, video conferencing, remote access and Webinar. To learn more, visit our Web site here: RHUB Home

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Frequently Asked Questions About Measuring Webinar Marketing.

September 13th, 2013

When your company invests time and
resources into Internet Webcasting, it’s
important to know how many clients are
viewing your Webcast meetings. You
might try to identify exactly who is
watching your Webinars, but here’s the
more important question: Which viewers
are progressing forward with making
additional purchases or subscribing to
your other services?
Obtaining this data can help you
determine the return on your investment.
So, what should your company look for
when assessing the metrics of your
Webinars? The question-and-answer segment below will help you examine the right key
performance indicators for maximizing the effectiveness of your Webinar marketing.
— — —
Q: What is the best way to capitalize on our video broadcasting and Webinars?

A: Companies that are most effective at conjuring revenue from their video Webcasting are those who have their Webinar data integrated with their customer relationship management team.

So, when your viewers finish attending your Webinar, for instance, your sales team can immediately follow up by reaching out during this fertile window of opportunity.

There are actually reports that indicate which clients have viewed your content and which of those attendees have gone on to purchase more products or services.

This data will illustrate how much revenue any particular live event Webcast has generated and all the new customers you’ve obtained from it. But the only way to know your return on investment is to track it.
— — —
Q: Is there anything else we should be monitoring in addition to the number of views our videos receive?

A: Yes! There is more valuable information available about your audience members beyond the mere number of them. Sure, it’s interesting to measure the number of views you receive on your free-access content that’s posted on YouTube or Vimeo.

Everybody wants to create a video that goes viral. But if your content is designed to generate further interest and create more demand from your potential clients, then you should track your statistics on a more useful level.

Instead of measuring your number of viewers, how about assessing the viewers themselves? Measure the number of people subscribed to your live streaming videos and analyze their demographics to determine whether you’re attracting your target customers.
— — —

Q: What’s the best way to know if our content will sell?

A: The key to knowing whether your Webcast production will generate revenue is by ensuring that your content is relevant to your prospective buyers. While a good salesperson might be able to sell ice to an arctic dweller, consider how much more product he or she could sell if the product being sold were space heaters!

Your content must be relevant to your viewership or else your potential client will be left out in the cold. If you want to create valuable content, then you will want to identify a very specific target audience.

Use analytics to determine which of your business Webcasts have spawned the most opportunities for your team to target a specific audience. Watch for trends in the data to help pinpoint what works and what doesn’t. In addition, don’t be afraid to ask your attendees what they want. Poll your audience. Send out surveys.

By keeping track of these crucial key performance indicators, you can create content that will not only appeal to your target audience, but also excite them! Turn your viewers into buyers by maximizing the effectiveness of your Webinar marketing.

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